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Solarwinds

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SUNSPOT: An injective attempt to execute a manual supply chain attack

Threat actors leveraged SUNSPOT to automatically inject the SUNBURST backdoor into the Orion app build process after executing the manual supply chain attack.

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  26-Jan-2021
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 6 min read

Related Articles

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Application Security

WAF

Learn why relying solely on WAFs for application security is not enough. Discove...

Web Application Firewalls (WAFs) have become a go-to security tool for organizations looking to protect their websites & web applications from a whole host of cyberattacks. WAFs can effectively block many types of attacks, including cross-site scripting (XSS), SQL injection, and more. But what if we told you that your organization's web applications and APIs may still be at risk even if you have a WAF in place? In this blog post, we'll know the reasons why even with WAF, your organization is not safe! ### WAFs are not foolproof: While WAFs work by looking for known patterns or indicators of attacks in incoming traffic and blocking requests that match these patterns. However, hackers are also leveraging new techniques to bypass WAFs, making it difficult for WAFs to keep up with the ever-evolving threat landscape For example, an attacker can use obfuscation techniques to hide malicious payloads or encode payloads to evade pattern-based detection. Additionally, an attacker can use a slow attack rate or make slight variations to bypass WAFs' rate-limiting rules. In some cases, attackers can bypass WAFs entirely by exploiting application logic flaws that are outside the scope of WAFs. ### WAFs do not protect against all types of attacks: WAFs help protects against common web-based attacks, but do not provide comprehensive attacks. For example, WAFs are not designed to protect against attacks that primarily target the application vulnerability, such as code injection or misconfigured servers. They also do not protect against attacks that target users directly, such as phishing or social engineering. ### WAFs can cause false positives: WAFs can often generate false positives, blocking legitimate traffic and preventing users from accessing your application. False positives can occur due to various reasons, such as misconfiguration, inadequate rules, or unanticipated traffic patterns. For example, if you have an e-commerce website, a sudden surge in traffic during holiday sales might trigger a false positive and block legitimate traffic, leading to frustration among users and can also cause operational issues for your organization. Therefore, WAFs can be an important part of your application security strategy but shouldn't be relied upon as the sole means of protecting your application highlighting the imperativeness of adopting a comprehensive tool that manages it all from a single platform without any hiccups. This brings us to [Threatspy](https://bit.ly/3PV3C4M), which enables teams to proactively manage known, unknown, and third-party vulnerabilities inside their applications by automating the detection, prioritization, and remediation process. It uses a heuristic approach to identify vulnerabilities and prioritize them with a custom-built Reachability Framework, providing a Security Posture score based on contextual analysis, allowing your organization to take a more comprehensive and effective approach towards protecting your applications & APIs from the inside out. Experience Threatspy in action with our [free trial!](https://www.secureblink.com/threatspy#join-waitlist)

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  02-Mar-2023
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  3 min read
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Heuristic

Application Security

In this blog, we discuss the underlying concepts of the Heuristic Application Se...

Application security scanning is a process used to identify security vulnerabilities in applications. Heuristic scanning is a type of application security scanning that uses rules and algorithms to identify security vulnerabilities in an application. This is different from signature-based scanning, which uses predefined signatures to detect possible vulnerabilities. In this [blog](https://bit.ly/3Xfos1A), we will understand what heuristic application security scanning is and how it is different from traditional signature-based application security scanning. ## Heuristic Application Security Scanning Heuristic application security scanning does not need a database to detect vulnerabilities. This type of application security scanning uses rules and algorithms to identify vulnerabilities that signature-based scanning methods may not detect. This is why it is able to identify zero-day vulnerabilities, the ones that have been disclosed but don't have any available patch or fix, classifying them under the category of unknown vulnerabilities. ## Signature-Based Application Security Scanning Signature-based scanning is a traditional application security scanning process primarily used to identify known vulnerabilities by searching for predefined signatures. These scanners rely on a database of signatures, and their checks depend only on non-reliable criteria, such as the version details and numbers of the target web application, file paths, and directory structures, etc. due to that, they are more prone to reporting false positives in detecting vulnerabilities. This means they are ineffective at defending against ever-evolving attacks, constantly being updated to evade detection. ## Conclusion In conclusion, both heuristic application security scanning and signature-based application security scanning play a crucial role in the overall security of applications against modern threats. By using both methods to scan for vulnerabilities, organizations can ensure the overall security of applications. So we have developed [Threatspy](https://bit.ly/3Woo7JN), a Heuristic AppSec Management Platform that enables an organization to proactively address the known, unknown & third-party vulnerabilities associated with their applications by adaptively automating the detection, prioritizations, and remediation process before threat actors exploit them. By staying attuned to the latest application security trends, organizations can outperform without worrying about their web applications and keep them safe from ever-evolving threats. Want to take the very first step towards integrating Heuristic Approach in your application security? Then [head over to request a demo](https://bit.ly/3PV3C4M) to witness Threatspy in action!

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  07-Jan-2023
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  2 min read
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SaaS

Application Security

Seamlessly prioritize your SaaS application security with our tailored checklist...

SaaS application's radical transformation proliferating the growth of businesses in varying verticals doesn't conceal the underlying security risks. Our research suggests that the amalgamation of remote work transition, shortage of security professionals, and even the inbuilt SaaS application complexity propelled CIOs & CISOs to prioritize SaaS application security before anything else. We have prepared a tailored set of best practices by introducing our SaaS Application Security Checklist. It is based on our extensive findings throughout our threat research in order to equip the organizations to decipher the intricacies of SaaS Applications Security. ### Our Comprehensive SaaS Application Security Checklist **Bridging Concealed Configuration Gaps:** More than 55% of companies have had sensitive data exposed over the public network, often due to unknown misconfiguration lapses. The configurability that makes SaaS Applications robust is also a viable cause of exploitation if not closely monitored & addressed. Gaining unified visibility becomes highly imperative for effectively configuring the SaaS Application to keep the underlying operations risk-free from any external threats. **Disable Legacy Authentication Protocols:** Many failed login attempts are due to legacy authentication, which does not support multi-factor authentication (MFA). Even if multi-factor authentication (MFA) is enabled for the directory, an attacker might still get unauthorized access by utilizing an older authentication method. A total ban on authentication requests from legacy protocols is the most effective measure you can take to prevent your environment from being exploited by fraudsters. **Enforce High Levels Of Security Authentication:** An account is 99.9% less likely to be compromised if you use MFA as an integral part of the enhanced authentication process. Access control for SaaS resources can be difficult to establish because of the several methods by which cloud providers can handle authentication. **Monitor & Analyze Conditional Access Policies:** Many intrusions primarily rely on exploiting vulnerabilities in conditional access controls, such as by creating new exceptions or implementing exception rules. Considering the potential depth and complexity of these rules, it is essential to validate rules and enable continuous monitoring. Always be on the lookout for IP address blocking updates and exceptions. **Evaluate Third-Party Access:** Integrations and third-party applications are frequently installed with elevated permissions and can serve as entry points for horizontal privilege escalation to other SaaS platforms. Ensure all third-party access to applications is processed, authorized, and utilized. Granting permissions and data access to third-party applications according to the principle of least privilege and removing access as soon as it is no longer required can reduce the danger of a compromise by a third party. **Determine User Access Data Management:** As ransomware attacks expand and the toolsets used to execute them become more widely dispersed, the use of least-privilege access provides more security. Better safeguarding of all data sets in the best possible manner via the use of data access modeling and analysis of third-party applications. **Keep An Eye Out For Red Flags:** Be wary of excessive failures and password spraying. Protect yourself by checking threat intelligence streams for signs of compromised accounts. If you can detect unauthorized actions quickly, you can react and mitigate the situation more effectively. SaaS applications become primarily responsible for running multiple critical business functions across cross-platforms. Thus its overall security often remains critical & complex with the advent of newer tech stacks. Therefore, extending the visibility throughout your SaaS ecosystem by continuously monitoring, addressing misconfigurations, and keeping a close eye on third-party access may hold the potential intrusion attempts at bay. At the same time, your businesses continue to run flawlessly. ### Are you still concerned about your SaaS Application Security? Let us introduce Threatspy! The absolute platform that addresses all your SaaS application security issues within a few clicks. If that interests you, please find a suitable time for a meeting [here](https://bit.ly/3UahQ3m) to experience Threatspy in action!

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  07-Nov-2022
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  4 min read