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Security

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ZerDay

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Eleven Zero Days detected

Recently, Google Project Zero issued a list of vulnerabilities utilized in 2019. Along with the report, Google also discussed the zero-day vulnerabilities that ...

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  22-Aug-2020
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 3 min read

Related Articles

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Activison

Call of Duty

Malware

Call of Duty cheats turned out to be RAT malware and dropper, threat actor poste...

Call of Duty: Warzone cheat programs were disguised by remote-access trojan (RAT) malware, according to a warning issued by Activision. Threat actors are targeting popular cheating sites to circulate the masqueraded cheats across the users. While this "newbie-friendly" strategy that explicitly shows how to circulate this malware through convincing it to be a video game cheat to the users of Call of Duty: Warzone was posted in a hacking forum back in March for the first time, as per the **[Activision](https://research.activision.com/publications/2021/03/cheating-cheaters-malware-delivered-as-call-of-duty-cheats)** warning. ***“It is common practice when configuring a cheat program to run it with the highest system privileges, ”*** Activision reported. ***“Guides for cheats will typically ask users to disable or uninstall antivirus software and host firewalls, disable kernel code-signing, etc.”*** Now for those who are not familiar with the team, 'cheats' are a program that creates interference with the in-game activities or players' interactions that leads to additional advantages that may seem to be unfair to their opponents. However, they are often banned from being utilized by the official creators of the game. ![COD-fake-cheat-ad](https://sb-cms.s3.ap-south-1.amazonaws.com/COD-fake-cheat-ad_d80cd8fa0d/COD-fake-cheat-ad_COD-fake-cheat-ad_d80cd8fa0d.png) ### **IDENTIFIED AS DROPPER** “COD-Dropper v0.1.” is the name of the malware that the researchers eventually identified. ***“Instead of malicious actors putting in hours of work creating complicated mitigation bypasses or leveraging existing exploits – they can instead work to create convincing cheat advertisements, which is priced competitively, could potentially get some attention,"*** Activision’s report added. ***“In December 2020, the dropper was also included in a ‘black hat’ tutorial aimed at ‘noobies’ looking to make some easy money.”*** Moreover, the Activision report also pinpoints that cheat forums filter out any malicious activities, which means the threat actors might have maintained a low profile to keep from getting booted. ***“This advertisement did not appear to be particularly clever or take much effort, but still had people replying, asking if anyone had tried it before being removed a day later, ”*** the report said. Additionally, the threat actor behind injecting this malware posted the entire malware file to set up the attack, which gained over 10,000 views and 260 replies. Besides, it was later followed up by further instruction in the post's comment along with a video tutorial link that redirects to a YouTube video that has over 5,000 views. ***“In likely a further attempt to scam people, the description also offered a private version of the cheat for a $10 BTC payment, ”*** the report added. ![COD-youtube-](https://sb-cms.s3.ap-south-1.amazonaws.com/COD-youtube-_937b7931bb/COD-youtube-_COD-youtube-_937b7931bb.png) Here these comments indicate that the members of the hacking forum did try out and download the tool. Following YouTube video pushing, the same malware showed up last August, with a direct link to infect the user, which had received 376 views, Activision added. Activision also illustrated that manipulating the game players into downloading the software wasn't a heavy lift. ***“While this method is rather simplistic, it is ultimately a social-engineering technique that leverages the willingness of its target (players that want to cheat) to voluntarily lower their security protections and ignore warnings about running potentially malicious software, ”*** Activision added. ##CALL OF DUTY UNDER ATTACK BY MALICIOUS While it is a RAT that allows the threat actors to gain full access to the victim's device but it is also a dropper that can be customizable in installing other malicious code on the victim's device, as the observed dropper in this attack is a .NET app that implores the target to agree in allowing the bug admin privilege post successful downloading. ***“Once the payload has been saved to disk, the application creates a VBScript named ‘CheatEngine.VBS,'”*** according to the report. ***“It then starts the ‘CheatEngine.exe’ process and deletes the ‘CheatEngine.exe’ executable. The creator/generator is a .NET executable that contains the dropper .NET executable as a resource object.”*** If the victim clicks on **“:: Build::, the application inspects the ‘COD_bin’ object with the ‘dnlib’ .NET assembly library, it replaces the URL placeholder named ‘[[URL]]’ with the provided URL and saves the ‘COD_bin’ resource under a new filename, ”** according to the analysis. **“The video gaming industry is a popular target for various threat actors, ”** Activision said. ***“Players, as well as studios and publishers themselves, are at risk for both opportunistic and targeted cyberattacks – tactics range from leveraging fake APKs of popular mobile games to compromising accounts for resale. Even [advanced persistent threat] actors have been known to target the video-gaming industry.”*** The Call of Duty: Warzone incident surfaced on the same day that the Talos security team of Cisco **[published](https://blog.talosintelligence.com/2021/03/cheating-cheater-how-adversaries-are.html?m=1)** a new malware campaign targeting gamers who use cheats. These malicious cheats were previously utilized by unknown cryptor tools that deterred antivirus programs from detecting the payload. Talos didn’t identify the game titles that were targeted.

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  04-Apr-2021
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  5 min read
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Threat Actors

Cyberattacks

Here is some notable compilation of salient techniques that pretty much every us...

While talking about online safety Cyber Attack pops in many people's minds being the most common intimidation across the internet. And why it shouldn't be, as it often remains to be inevitable, leaving the netizens at stake. The ever-evolving threat landscape has grown to be even more sophisticated. So do the attack vectors that cybercriminals leverage to gain unauthorized access to any system or network, making it way more challenging to implement targeted cybersecurity solutions without quickly becoming obsolete. <br> This translates to staying ahead of any threat actors; enterprises and individuals also need to have a comprehensive awareness of prevalent cyber-attacks. And without that, preventive policies targeting the attacks won't be effective enough any longer, resulting in ballooning the cost of tackling cybercrime and its associated repercussions. As much as 50% of all cyberattacks target small businesses, costing over $200,000, which is fairly enough to jeopardize less-established companies out of business. <br> The significance of threat identification has never been easily exposed from a cybersecurity perspective in finding out the fundamental nature of posing a critical risk to an organization or personal life, making it circumstantially prone to formulating the ultimate enterprise-grade cybersecurity strategy in safeguarding against any abnormalities. This will ensure the effectiveness of the preventive measures and the allowance for better cybersecurity management on purpose. But it is also equally important to educate about the same in helping to develop substantial compatibility with the cybersecurity strategies and resources adopted by enterprises or individuals. <br> Understanding the cyber attacks and the different techniques cyber criminals employ to execute them can go a long way in establishing appropriate security frameworks. While there are several different ways to infiltrate an IT system, most cyber-attacks rely on similar techniques. <br> This proactive approach to internalizing application security is essential in defending enterprises from underlying threats & vulnerabilities of cyberattacks and maintaining business revenue with unwavering user loyalty. <br> #### **Cyber Attack** <br> A conscious attempt to maliciously exploit anyone through leveraging the underlying loopholes laid across in their interconnected IT system or network to a various extent depending upon the technology with the involvement of sophisticated resources and skills resulting in a compromised system or network, data breach, the infected system can be considered as a scenario of Cyber Attack. <br> #### **Categorical Explanation Of Cyber Attacker** <br> Cyberattack is mostly executed for malicious purpose, as the attackers may use several tools and techniques to perpetuate the cyberattack. Depending on their intent and the end objective, cyber attackers can be roughly grouped into: <br> **Cyber-Criminals** <br> This is classified based on individuals who primarily target organization information, customer data, or other critical data and monetize it on the dark web. They make use of sophisticated tools and techniques, use computer/mobile devices as a medium to perpetrate intelligent, hard-to-discover malicious cyberattacks. <br> **Hacktivists** <br> This is often classified as a prolific group having a non-financial agenda to propagate. They may perform an attack to reinforce their belief system, which could be political agenda, religious ideology, or a cause they want to be made known through their digital malfeasance. Depending on the political beliefs, they can be described as progressive, ethical, or plain disruptions, among other categories. <br> **State-Sponsored Attackers** <br> This is classified as cyberattacks targeted at a particular country to destabilize its social, economic, or military administration through the support of the country of their origin. They could perpetrate lone wolf attacks as well, showing allegiance to a particular state. <br> **Insider Threats** <br> Originate from employees, contractors, third-party affiliates of an organization and are hard to detect and prevent because of the trust factor involved. These attacks could be either malicious, accidental, or carried out due to pure negligence. <br> Although there are a plethora of ways to execute Cyber Attacks, However, here is some notable compilation of salient techniques that pretty much every user should be familiar with to remain vigilant against any cyber threats: <br> #### **Social Engineering** <br> ![Social-Engineering](https://sb-cms.s3.ap-south-1.amazonaws.com/Social-Engineering_c79980af5d/Social-Engineering_Social-Engineering_c79980af5d.png) <br> Social engineering is an umbrella term for a wide spectrum of disruptive practices in cybersecurity. To convince or manipulate people into doing such acts or obtain valuable information, cybercriminals use social engineering. In order to hijack accounts, impersonate characters, make fake payments, and more, they carry out these kinds of assaults. <br> The multiple types of attacks involving social engineering include: <br> **Phishing**: It is one of the most exploited social engineering attacks, where attackers send clickable links to malicious emails, enticing WhatsApp forwards, social media messages, and text messages. <br> **Spear Phishing**: Spear phishing is an email attack focused on customized ed, much like phishing. <br> **Vishing**: Often referred to as voice phishing, it includes scammers sending phone calls or leaving voice messages to mislead citizens into sharing confidential details. <br> **Baiting**: The intruder baits a person into doing the desired action in exchange for something, as the name implies. <br> **Quid Pro Quo**: Also known as a "something for something" attack where, in return for sensitive knowledge or resources, hackers provide free assistance or service. <br> **Pretexting**: To establish trust with end-users, the attacker impersonates a co-worker. The scammer appears to be highly influential and sends an email demanding tend-users to reveal vital business details. <br> **Tailgating**: The perpetrator secretly follows an approved person without knowing that person is breaching a protected area. <br> #### **Salami Slicing Attack** <br> ![Salami-Slicing-Attack](https://sb-cms.s3.ap-south-1.amazonaws.com/Salami-Slicing-Attack_0e3edd63aa/Salami-Slicing-Attack_Salami-Slicing-Attack_0e3edd63aa.png) <br> A “salami-slicing attack” or “salami fraud” is a technique leveraged by threat actors to extort financial assets or bit-sized resources at a time, avoiding any noticeable difference in the overall size. The threat actors manage to get away with these little pieces from many resources and thus accumulate a considerable amount over a while. The essence of this method is the failure to detect misappropriation. The most classic approach is the “collect-the-roundoff” technique. Most calculations are carried out in a particular currency and are rounded off up to the nearest number about half the time and down the rest of the time. If a programmer decides to collect these excess fractions of rupees to a separate account, no net loss to the system seems apparent. This is done by carefully transferring the funds into the perpetrator’s account. Attackers insert a program into the system to automatically carry out the task. Logic bombs may also be employed by unsatisfied greedy employees who exploit their network's know-how and privileged access to the system. In this technique, the criminal programs the arithmetic calculators to automatically modify data, such as interest calculations. Stealing money electronically is the most common use of the salami-slicing technique, but it’s not restricted to money laundering. <br> The salami technique can also be applied to gather little information to deduce an organization's overall picture. <br> This act of distributed information gathering may be against an individual or an organization. Data can be collected from websites, advertisements, documents collected from trash cans, and the like, gradually building up a whole database of actual intelligence about the target. Since misappropriation is just below the threshold of perception, we need to be more vigilant. Careful examination of our assets, transactions, and every other dealing, including sharing confidential information with others, might help reduce the chances of an attack by this method. <br> #### **Data Diddling** <br> ![Data-Diddling](https://sb-cms.s3.ap-south-1.amazonaws.com/Data-Diddling_4ceea37b8b/Data-Diddling_Data-Diddling_4ceea37b8b.png) <br> The unauthorized data alteration before or during entry into a computer system and then changing it back after processing is called Data Diddling. While using this technique, the threat actor may modify the expected output and is challenging to track. In translated terms, the original information to be entered is changed, either by a person typing in the data, a virus that's programmed to change the data, the programmer of the database or application, or anyone else involved in the process of creating, recording, encoding, examining, checking, converting or transmitting data. <br> This is one of the simplest methods of committing a cyber-related crime because even a computer amateur can do it. Despite this being an effortless task, it can have detrimental effects. For example, a person responsible for accounting may change data about themselves or a friend or relative showing that they're paid in full. By altering or failing to enter the information, they're able to steal from the enterprise. Other examples include forging or counterfeiting documents and exchanging valid computer tapes or cards with prepared replacements. Electricity boards in India have been victims of data diddling by computer criminals when private parties computerized their systems. <br> #### **Web Jacking** <br> ![Web-Jacking](https://sb-cms.s3.ap-south-1.amazonaws.com/Web-Jacking_406e564510/Web-Jacking_Web-Jacking_406e564510.png) <br> Web jacking derives its name from "hijacking." Here, the hacker takes control of a website fraudulently. He may change the original site's content and redirect the user to another fake similar-looking page controlled by him. The website owner retains it, and the attacker may use the website for his selfish intentions. Cases have been reported where the attacker has asked for a ransom and even published obscene material on the site. <br> The web jacking method attack may be used to create a website clone and present the victim with the new link saying that it has moved. Unlike usual phishing methods, when you hover your cursor over the link provided, the URL presented will be the original one and not the attacker's site. But when you click on the new link, it opens and is quickly replaced with the malicious web server. The address bar's name will be slightly different from the original website that can trick the user into thinking it's a legitimate site. For example, "Gmail” may direct you to "gmai1". Notice the one in place of 'Ľ. It can be easily overlooked. <br> #### **DNS Tunneling** <br> ![DNS-Tunneling](https://sb-cms.s3.ap-south-1.amazonaws.com/DNS-Tunneling_4dcb5ccd5d/DNS-Tunneling_DNS-Tunneling_4dcb5ccd5d.png) <br> DNS tunneling is a sophisticated attack vector designed to provide attackers with continued access to a given target. Since many organizations fail to monitor DNS traffic for malicious activity, attackers can insert or “tunnel” malware into DNS queries (DNS requests sent from the client to the server). The malware is used to create a persistent communication channel that most firewalls are unable to detect. For malicious use, DNS requests are manipulated to exfiltrate data from a compromised system to the threat actor's infrastructure. It can also be used for command and control callbacks from the threat actor's infrastructure to a compromised system. <br> #### **Watering Hole Attacks** <br> ![Watering-Hole- Attacks](https://sb-cms.s3.ap-south-1.amazonaws.com/Watering-Hole-_Attacks_b7f8b1a7ac/Watering-Hole-Attacks_Watering-Hole-_Attacks_b7f8b1a7ac.png) <br> A watering hole attack occurs when an attacker injects malicious code onto a public website to steal personal information. Threat actors will monitor the web activity logs of upper-level executives to identify the sites they visit most often. From there, an exploit code is written and uploaded. This form of attack is often coupled with Zero-day exploits, making it very hard to protect against. The success rate of watering hole attacks made it a go-to attack method for cybercriminals in 2019, and this trend is expected to continue in 2020. <br> #### **Injection Attacks** <br> ![Injection-Attacks](https://sb-cms.s3.ap-south-1.amazonaws.com/Injection-Attacks_07827d7f7a/Injection-Attacks_Injection-Attacks_07827d7f7a.png) <br> Injection attacks refer to a broad class of attack vectors mainly targeting the underlying vulnerabilities of web architecture. In an injection attack, a threat actor supplies untrusted input to a program. This input gets processed by an interpreter as part of a command or query. In turn, this alters the execution of that program <br> Injections are amongst the oldest and most dangerous attacks aimed at web applications. <br> They can lead to data theft, data loss, data integrity loss, denial of service, and complete system compromise. The primary reason for injection vulnerabilities is usually a lack of sufficient user input validation. This attack type is considered a significant problem in web security. It is listed as the number one web application security risk in the OWASP Top 10 – and for a good reason. Injection attacks, particularly SQL Injections (SQLi attacks) and Cross-site Scripting (XSS) are hazardous and widespread, especially in legacy applications. <br> Cyberattacks are pacing at an alarming extent; especially the techniques used behind some of them seem to be quite unprecedented in this world, aided by rapid technological transitions at every turn. While it may be intimidating to identify and eradicate the underlying threats and vulnerabilities in the entire system, which often tends to be dormant and stealthily exploit the resources, however, without complying with the standard security protocol even makes the system more prone to becoming a victim of the next big attack. Besides, it also becomes equally essential to have the accessibility of a management platform that offers visibility of the entire system application, real-time surveillance, automated detection, and response against any abnormalities identified in the radar, ensuring that the whole application possesses a robust strategy to endure any future attacks and minimize it's pertaining consequences. <br> ![Threat-Spy](https://sb-cms.s3.ap-south-1.amazonaws.com/Threat-Spy_dbd9970841/Threat-Spy_Threat-Spy_dbd9970841.png) <br> SecureBlink's **[ThreatSpy](https://www.secureblink.com/threat-spy)** actually takes care of all the points mentioned above, along with some other parks, to streamline the process of threat management. It is an automated application security management platform with AI-graded capabilities that primarily focuses on critical Threats & Vulnerabilities while targeting enterprises' application security at the code level. Though it identifies and rolls out patches depending upon the threat landscape of the application, however, its future threat predictability comes with a complete accuracy rate based on the instant scores of the application, including a detailed report that offers red alerts to critical vulnerabilities while ensuring an effective threat incident response with compliance to ZERO-TRUST strategies to keep all the malicious intents at bay.

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  08-Mar-2021
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  13 min read
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Cyberattacks

90% Of Cyber Attacks Successfully Across The World, Human Errors Are Considered...

Cyber Attacks can be grievously detrimental to any extent, not only for an entire enterprise but as an individual; it is not less than a nightmare. However, ironically, behind 90% Of Cyber Attacks Successfully Across The World, Human Errors Are Considered To Be The Prime Reason Of Their **[Origination](https://www.secureblink.com/blog/upgrade-your-organisations-cybersecurity-with-six-key-points)** <br> ![HUMAN_ERRORS_IN_CYBERSECURITY](https://sb-cms.s3.ap-south-1.amazonaws.com/HUMAN_ERRORS_IN_CYBERSECURITY_88c0b17503/HUMAN_ERRORS_IN_CYBERSECURITY_HUMAN_ERRORS_IN_CYBERSECURITY_88c0b17503.png) <br> And yet, one of the most significant impacts of a successful cyber attack is the exposure of information, loss of intellectual property, and the infection of malware. A report by **[Vormetric](https://cpl.thalesgroup.com/encryption/vormetric-data-security-platform)** found that 59% of respondents agree that most information technology security threats that directly result from insiders are the result of honest and straightforward mistakes rather than the abuse of privileges. <br> There’s not a single person alive who never makes mistakes. Making mistakes is a core part of the human experience - it is how we grow and learn. Yet, in cybersecurity, human mistakes are far too often overlooked. In other words, if human error was somehow eliminated, 19 out of 20 cyber breaches may not have taken place at all! <br> So, why does human error cause so many breaches, and why have existing solutions failed to address it? Let’s take a look at the story behind human error - and what you can do to improve employee cyber behavior in your organization. <br> ###**What are human errors in cybersecurity security?** <br> ![Humanerror-Cyberattack](https://sb-cms.s3.ap-south-1.amazonaws.com/Humanerror-Cyberattack_c085a2fbe8/Humanerror-Cyberattack_Humanerror-Cyberattack_c085a2fbe8.png) <br> When discussing human error in cybersecurity, what is meant by the term is slightly different from its use in more general terms. In a cybersecurity context, human error means unintentional actions - or lack of movement - by employees and users that cause, spread, or allow a security breach to take place. <br> This comprises a wide range of activities, from downloading a malware-infected attachment to failing to **[use a strong password](https://www.secureblink.com/blog/the-worst-passwords-of-all-time-that-may-become-a-matter-of-concern-for-anyone)** - which is part of the reason why it can be so challenging to address. <br> With our ever more advanced and complicated work environments, we have an increasing number of tools and services that we use - and we have usernames and passwords and other things to remember for each of them. This all adds up, and when not provided alternative, secure solutions, employees start taking shortcuts to make life easier for themselves. <br> As if this wasn’t enough for end-users to struggle to make the right actions, they also have to deal with the constant threat of cybercriminals affecting their decision-making. Social engineering has an increasing role in all types of security breaches. It is used to exploit employees' capability to hand over data or credentials right into the hands of bad actors without them having to write a single line of a malware program or software exploit. <br> ###**Types of human error** <br> While human error opportunities are almost infinite, they can broadly be categorized into two different types: skill-based and decision-based errors. The difference between these two essentially comes down to whether or not the person had the required knowledge to perform the correct action. <br> **•Skill-based errors** <br> The skill-based human error consists of slips and lapses: small mistakes occur when performing familiar tasks and activities. In these scenarios, the end-user knows what the correct course of action is but fails to do so due to a temporary lapse, mistake, or negligence. This might happen because the employee is tired, not paying attention, is distracted, or otherwise has a brief lapse of memory. <br> **•Decision-based errors** <br> Decision-based errors are when a user makes a wrong decision. There can be many different factors that play into this: often, it includes the user not having the necessary level of knowledge, not having enough information about the specific circumstance, or not even realizing that they are deciding on their inaction. <br> ###**Underlying Threat Posed By Human Errors** <br> ![Human-Error-Cyber-Security](https://sb-cms.s3.ap-south-1.amazonaws.com/Human-Error-Cyber-Security_43e4fac723/Human-Error-Cyber-Security_Human-Error-Cyber-Security_43e4fac723.png) <br> The most widespread mistake employees encounter while sending sensitive documents to unintended recipients. This is relatively easy to solve when deploying security controls to monitor sensitive information being leaked out of the organization. These controls were once considered complex to deploy but have now been made considerably more comfortable to implement by vendors in recent years. This has dramatically reduced the level of user involvement required and increased the use of such controls. <br> These tools can also preclude users from engaging in inappropriate behavior. Sending documents home via email or placing them on file-sharing sites or removable media such as USB sticks can all be avoided. The thriving culture of bring-your-own-device **(BYOD)** exposes more crucial concerns, especially with the risk of lost or stolen mobile devices. Again, technology is available to help companies control what happens to data stored on such devices, even allowing sensitive data to be remotely wiped so that it doesn’t fall into the wrong hands. <br> Even the most trusted and highly skilled employees run significant risks of human error. System and influential network administrators are commonly guilty of system misconfigurations, poor patch management practices, and the use of default names and passwords. There are numerous security controls that organizations can explore to guard against these types of threats. <br> **•Misdelivery** <br> While sending something to the wrong recipient is a common threat to corporate data security, however, according to Verizon's 2018 breach report. Misdelivery was the fifth most common cause of all cybersecurity breaches. With many people relying on features such as auto-suggestion in their email clients, it is easy for any user to accidentally send confidential information to the wrong person if they aren't careful. <br> One of the most severe data breaches caused by human error was when an NHS practice revealed the email ids (and thus names) of over 800 patients who had visited HIV clinics? How did the error happen? The emp employee sending out an email notification to HIV patients accidentally entered their email addresses to the to'' field, rather than the "bcc'' field, exposing their details to each other. This is a classic example of a skill-based error, as the employee knew the correct course of action but didn't take enough care to ensure that they were doing what they intended to be. <br> **•Patching** <br> Cybercriminals are always on the lookout for new explanations in software. When exploits are discovered, the software developers race to fix the vulnerability and send out the patch to all users before cybercriminals can compromise more users. This is why users must install security updates on their computers as soon as they are available. Unfortunately, more often than not, end-users delay the installation of updates - and with dire results <br> The 2017 **[WannaCry ransomware attack](https://www.secureblink.com/cyber-security-news/north-korean-hackers)** affected hundreds of thousands of computers worldwide, costing companies and organizations millions of dollars in damages. The exploit used by the attack dubbed EternalBlue was patched by Microsoft months before the attacks took place. If the affected computers had just had the security update downloaded and installed, they would never have been compromised. <br> **•Password Problems** <br> Humans and passwords don't get along. The facts from the **[National Centre for Cyber Security's 2019 report](https://www.ncsc.gov.uk/news/annual-review-2019)** cast a lousy image that 123456 remains the most popular password globally, and 45% of people reuse the password of their primary email account on other services. In addition to not creating strong, unique, passwords untrained users commit many different passwords, mistakes including writing down passwords on post-it notes on their monitors or sharing them with colleagues. <br> **•Physical security errors** <br> While data breaches are most often attributed to cyberattacks, businesses are also liable to physical threats. Confidential information and credentials can be stolen or viewed by unauthorized persons to gain access to secure premises. Physical security errors come in many different forms, but one of the most common is leaving sensitive documents unattended on desks, meeting rooms, or even printer output trays. Anyone gaining access to the enterprise premises can then just pick up the paper without letting anyone know about it's missing. <br> Another widespread physical security error allowing tailgating is when an unauthorized person follows someone through a secure door or barrier, usually by merely walking close behind them. Many employees will feel it rude to contest anyone following behind them through a door, ensuring a high success rate on tailgating attempts. <br> ###**Human Errors Mitigation With Practical Cybersecurity Awareness** <br> ![cyber-security-cyber-attack](https://sb-cms.s3.ap-south-1.amazonaws.com/cyber-security-cyber-attack_2c260aaad9/cyber-security-cyber-attack_cyber-security-cyber-attack_2c260aaad9.png) <br> The avoidance of Human Errors can be considered as the best strategy for keeping their data secure. The absence of immediate damage to your organization isn’t a reason to leave your cybersecurity policy as is. <br> The only way to mitigate human mistakes in cybersecurity is to use a complex holistic strategy for preventing insider threats and enhancing your cybersecurity. <br> Here are the most common ways to adopt the following practices and solutions, which can effectively protect an enterprise from any future possible human errors leading to a cyber attack: <br> **•Corporate Security Policy Scrutiny & Updation:** <br> Your security policy should clearly outline how to handle critical data and passwords, who can access them, which security and monitoring software to use, etc. Revise your security rules and check whether all current best practices are reflected in the document. <br> **•Bring Awareness Among Humans:** <br> Make sure every employee is aware of potential threats and explain how dangerous and expensive the consequences of their mistakes can be. It will help educate your employees about the risks such errors pose to the organization’s security. Make sure everyone is familiar with the corporate security policy and is motivated to follow the rules. <br> **•Use the principle of least privilege:** <br> The easiest and reliable way to secure data access is to deny all access by default. Allow privileged access only when needed on a case-by-case basis. If users can only access data required for their work, you can prevent accidental data leaks and data deletion caused by employees who aren’t supposed to work with specific sensitive data in the first place while keeping an additional backup. <br> **•Monitor your employees:** <br> User activity behavior monitoring tools must detect malicious activity meticulously and secure the system from future data leaks and malicious attacks. The most reliable way to ensure accurate detection and prevention of unwanted anomalies is by integrating an automated application security management platform such as **[ThreatSpy](https://www.secureblink.com/threat-spy)**. <br> **•Communicative Practices:** <br> Several workspace errors involving humans can be traced to a lack of communication. Every employee on your team should feel comfortable communicating with each other and with superiors. Without open lines of communication at all levels, dangerous accidents are inevitable. <br> ###**Conclusions: Humans Errors; The Most Vulnerable Link To Exploit** <br> ![Cyber-Security-Human-Error](https://sb-cms.s3.ap-south-1.amazonaws.com/Cyber-Security-Human-Error_6ae88cfa58/Cyber-Security-Human-Error_Cyber-Security-Human-Error_6ae88cfa58.png) <br> An attempt to articulate the most significant facts and figures that often remain undermined from everyone's attention tells an entirely different story with a frightening statistic about how many cyberattacks are caused by human error; however, the same perspective can be changed at that statistic If 95% of the breaches are caused by human error, taking even the smallest steps towards reducing human error can create huge gains in security. The mitigation of human error has to come from two angles: reducing opportunity and effectively educating as many users as possible. The fewer chances there will be for error, the fewer users will be tested for their knowledge. The more experience your users have, the less likely they are to make a mistake even when they come across an opportunity to do so. <br> Although the issues caused by human errors are comparatively less expensive, unlike any data beaches due to malware, nonetheless, they still manage to pose a critical threat to the security and the availability of your sensitive data and business-critical resources. <br> This approach should be adapted most often by promoting to encourage you to see the human risk from a different light. Although untrained end-users may often be the weakest link of an organization's security, the right tools and training allow the same to be empowered as the first line of defense against any cyber attack, espionage, or a breach, safeguarding the entire business in the long term.

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  25-Feb-2021
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  11 min read